Dance is not Life just part of the whole

In the technical sense, there is some truth to that statement.  In the past (think up until the 1900s) it was often a contract between individuals and their respective families.  Love had very little to do with it.  To be sure, love was the ideal, but it was often believed that you GREW into being in love rather than just loving and having that love grow.  It was more about creating economic advantages for both the current (through finding an ideal monetary mate) and future generations (through teaching them to get good jobs and be able to support their parents.)  In a world where (often, not always, but often) both individuals have to have a job to support a good household, that dynamic has completely shifted.  
Is marriage better for having romance being an integral part of it?  I think so.  I do think the friend/family support structure is kind of important to maintaining it, though.

In the technical sense, there is some truth to that statement.  In the past (think up until the 1900s) it was often a contract between individuals and their respective families.  Love had very little to do with it.  To be sure, love was the ideal, but it was often believed that you GREW into being in love rather than just loving and having that love grow.  It was more about creating economic advantages for both the current (through finding an ideal monetary mate) and future generations (through teaching them to get good jobs and be able to support their parents.)  In a world where (often, not always, but often) both individuals have to have a job to support a good household, that dynamic has completely shifted.  

Is marriage better for having romance being an integral part of it?  I think so.  I do think the friend/family support structure is kind of important to maintaining it, though.

(Source: thedrtomm, via beardmanly)

getintunee:

lost—in—absentia:

lost—in—absentia:

Chickasaw Nation: The Fight to Save a Dying Native American Language
A 50,000 year-old indigenous Native American tribe that has weathered the conquistadors, numerous wars with the Europeans, the American Revolution and the Civil War is now fighting to preserve its language and culture by embracing modern technology.
There are 6,000 languages spoken in the world but linguists fear that 50% of them will become extinct within the next century. In the US, 175 Native American languages are spoken, but fewer than 20 are expected to survive the next 100 years.
The language of the Chickasaws, known as “Chikashshanompa”, is a 3,000-year-old living language that is categorised by Unesco as being “severely endangered”.
The last remaining monolingual speaker of this language, Emily Johnson Dickerson, 93, died in December. Now the tribe is scrambling to make sure that its language does not become lost.
Dwindling native speakers
The Chickasaw Nation consists of 57,000 people, including 38,000 who live in 13 counties in Oklahoma, a state designated as the Indian Territory which boasts rich oil and natural gas preserves.
"There were over 3,000 speakers of Chickasaw in the 1960s," Joshua Hinson, director of the Chickasaw Nation Language Department tells IBTimes UK.
"The last native speakers who learnt the language at home were born in the late 1940s. From that point on, with people leaving Oklahoma for other parts of the US, mandatory schooling and political pressures to be bilingual in English, the number of people dropped, and now, our youngest native speakers are in their 60s."
There are now only 65 native speakers of the Chickasaw language who are also fully bilingual in English, and only four to five confident conversational speakers who are under the age of 35.
Modern Chickasaw people in Oklahoma live in houses on land held in trust for the Chickasaw Nation by the Federal government.
They have been Christian since the Civil War, although religion co-exists with traditional native Chickasaw customs.
Some customs have died out, such as the native doctors and practice of native medicine, but others, like the role of the woman as a matriarch in the family and in government, have continued, and 60% of the community’s leaders are women.Read more at:http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/chickasaw-nation-fight-save-dying-native-american-language-1447670

Whoever reblogged this and got it to 280 notes…THANK YOU.Preservation of language is a cultural necessity! 

getintunee:

lost—in—absentia:

lost—in—absentia:

Chickasaw Nation: The Fight to Save a Dying Native American Language

A 50,000 year-old indigenous Native American tribe that has weathered the conquistadors, numerous wars with the Europeans, the American Revolution and the Civil War is now fighting to preserve its language and culture by embracing modern technology.

There are 6,000 languages spoken in the world but linguists fear that 50% of them will become extinct within the next century. In the US, 175 Native American languages are spoken, but fewer than 20 are expected to survive the next 100 years.

The language of the Chickasaws, known as “Chikashshanompa”, is a 3,000-year-old living language that is categorised by Unesco as being “severely endangered”.

The last remaining monolingual speaker of this language, Emily Johnson Dickerson, 93, died in December. Now the tribe is scrambling to make sure that its language does not become lost.

Dwindling native speakers

The Chickasaw Nation consists of 57,000 people, including 38,000 who live in 13 counties in Oklahoma, a state designated as the Indian Territory which boasts rich oil and natural gas preserves.

"There were over 3,000 speakers of Chickasaw in the 1960s," Joshua Hinson, director of the Chickasaw Nation Language Department tells IBTimes UK.

"The last native speakers who learnt the language at home were born in the late 1940s. From that point on, with people leaving Oklahoma for other parts of the US, mandatory schooling and political pressures to be bilingual in English, the number of people dropped, and now, our youngest native speakers are in their 60s."

There are now only 65 native speakers of the Chickasaw language who are also fully bilingual in English, and only four to five confident conversational speakers who are under the age of 35.

Modern Chickasaw people in Oklahoma live in houses on land held in trust for the Chickasaw Nation by the Federal government.

They have been Christian since the Civil War, although religion co-exists with traditional native Chickasaw customs.

Some customs have died out, such as the native doctors and practice of native medicine, but others, like the role of the woman as a matriarch in the family and in government, have continued, and 60% of the community’s leaders are women.

Read more at:
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/chickasaw-nation-fight-save-dying-native-american-language-1447670

Whoever reblogged this and got it to 280 notes…THANK YOU.
Preservation of language is a cultural necessity! 

(Source: fani-hilha, via ealperin)

alsoartsistra:

rinpin:

devinchee:

the-writers-ramblings:

xveritaxx:

Hugh Jackman as Gaston in Beauty and the Beast on Broadway

NO ONE STEALS BREAD LIKE GASTON

PAINTS EGGS LIKE GASTON

OR SLICES UP BAD GUYS WITH CLAWS LIKE GASTON

I tried not to reblog this but I couldn’t, not after you just made a Les Miserables, Rise of the Guardians and Wolverine reference.

I think I may have reblogged this once before but I’m doing it again.  I love that he’s a musical theater guy!  That he got to be a character in “Beauty and the Beast is even more awesome in my book.

(via tillatheseasgangdry)

kingdomoftheballerino:

Carla Korbes and Batkurel Bold in dress rehearsal for Concerto Barocco

I love this motion.  The slide into an arabesque.  Gorgeous!

kingdomoftheballerino:

Carla Korbes and Batkurel Bold in dress rehearsal for Concerto Barocco

I love this motion.  The slide into an arabesque.  Gorgeous!

(via danceistolivetoliveistodance)

ealperin:

postracialcomments:

babycakesbriauna:

scandal-whipped:

postracialcomments:

An Ohio special grand jury decided after days of deliberation that no officers will be charged in the shooting of 22-year-old John Crawford III, who was shot and killed inside a Beaverton Wal-Mart while carrying an air rifle sold at the store.

Special Prosecutor Mark Piepmeier announced Wednesday morning at a press conference that the jury found the Aug. 5 police shooting justified.

WHIO reports that this is the third time in the past five years that an Ohio grand jury has decided not to indict police in a case in which the shooting was highly questionable.

According to witnesses, Crawford was walking around the store carrying a gun that is similar to a BB gun at his waist. Police responded to calls of a man carrying a gun, and when they encountered Crawford, they claim, he didn’t respond to calls to drop the gun and was shot.

Source

My blood is fucking boiling

HOW THE FUCK IS THE SHOOTING JUSTIFIED IF HE WASNT HARMED?

THERE WAS NO PHYSICAL THREAT TO ANY CIVILIAN

THE FUCKER THAT CALLED THE POLICE ADMITTED THE HE FUCKING LIED

What in the world? 

THIS IS BULLSHIT

MORE BULLSHIT

Vince Pope, attorney for the officers involved in the shooting, released the following statement: “I believe the grand jury’s decision, it’s absolutely the right decision, that the officers acted well within their training.” 

UPDATE @11:35 a.m.: A special grand jury has decided not to indict the officers in the Beavercreek Walmart shooting. The grand jury found officers were justified in their actions.

Source

image

 I think the problem is that they are considered to have acted in a justified manner based on the information given to them (false info, I might add).  If anything, I suspect a case could be made to charge the guy making the false 911 call with perjury or something along those lines.  

kameliendame:

Swan Lake [source]

Agnès Letestu and José Martinez

I adore the focus on the hands.  It’s one of the reasons it’s a good idea to go to a ballet with binoculars if you’re in the balcony.

(via stepsandpirouettes)

Jaime & Brienne // Tale as old as time…

LOL.

(Source: fseventh, via bossassbitchplzbowdown)

bossassbitchplzbowdown:

when I was younger I truly believed Wonder Woman’s secret identity was Lois Lane and I have no clue why.  

like I guess I never heard them call her ‘Diana’ but I watched the pilot like fifty times, how’d I make such an assumption?

Ok, you’re not the only one (although that “other one” is not me but my son.)  The question I have for you is whether you feel more connected to the idea of Clark and Lois (a superhero that feels connected to humanity through loving a non-supoerpowered human that deserves to be called a hero in her own right) or Superman and Wonder Woman (focusing solely one the superheroics and the true identity of WW as the daughter of the queen of the amazons and Zeus) as far as ships go.  That would tell you whether you felt more connected to which ship.  FTR, I suppose you could like both but unless there’s a way for Diana to give up her mantle to Lois I doubt there will ever be another story where you could “Have your cake and eat it too” with regards to Wonder Woman’s secret identity being Lois Lane.  Please note I said “another”.  There is an elseworld story called “Whom Gods Destroy” where it ends with just this premise.  Diana is deemed unworthy (after siding with the Nazis in WWII) of the mantle and Athena, Artemis and one other goddess send Lois through a whole bunch of tests that ends with her becoming Wonder Woman.  It’s not a favorite among a lot of people (it’s a mythical journey in more ways than one and like many of the greek myths is convoluted and confusing in it’s storytelling).